An Intellectual History Of The Atlantic Charter Ideas Institutions And Human Rights In American Diplomacy 1941 1946

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An intellectual history of the Atlantic charter : ideas, institutions, and human rights in American diplomacy, 1941-1946 :

Author - Elizabeth Kopelman Borgwardt, Stanford University. Dept. of History
Publisher -
Pages - 876
ISBN -


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A New Deal for the World :

History

Author - Elizabeth Borgwardt
Publisher - Harvard University Press
Pages -
ISBN - 0674281926


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Detail - In a work of sweeping scope and luminous detail, Elizabeth Borgwardt describes how a cadre of World War II American planners inaugurated the ideas and institutions that underlie our modern international human rights regime. Borgwardt finds the key in the 1941 Atlantic Charter and its Anglo-American vision of "war and peace aims." In attempting to globalize what U.S. planners heralded as domestic New Deal ideas about security, the ideology of the Atlantic Charter--buttressed by FDR’s "Four Freedoms" and the legacies of World War I--redefined human rights and America’s vision for the world. Three sets of international negotiations brought the Atlantic Charter blueprint to life--Bretton Woods, the United Nations, and the Nuremberg trials. These new institutions set up mechanisms to stabilize the international economy, promote collective security, and implement new thinking about international justice. The design of these institutions served as a concrete articulation of U.S. national interests, even as they emphasized the importance of working with allies to achieve common goals. The American architects of these charters were attempting to redefine the idea of security in the international sphere. To varying degrees, these institutions and the debates surrounding them set the foundations for the world we know today. By analyzing the interaction of ideas, individuals, and institutions that transformed American foreign policy--and Americans’ view of themselves--Borgwardt illuminates the broader history of modern human rights, trade and the global economy, collective security, and international law. This book captures a lost vision of the American role in the world.

The Human Rights Revolution : An International History

History

Author - Akira Iriye, Petra Goedde, William I. Hitchcock
Publisher - Oxford University Press
Pages - 353
ISBN - 0195333144


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Detail - This volume explores the place of human rights in history, providing an alternative framework for understanding the political and legal dilemmas that these conflicts presented, with case studies focusing on the 1940s through the present.

Apartheid's Reluctant Uncle : The United States and Southern Africa in the Early Cold War

History

Author - Thomas Borstelmann
Publisher - Oxford University Press on Demand
Pages - 298
ISBN - 0195079426


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Detail - Despite the unsavory racism of Malan's government - Borstelmann shows that Pretoria fomented violence among black groups in the late 1940s, just as it has done recently between the ANC and Inkatha - the U.S. saw South Africa as a dependable and important ally. In addition, America was almost completely dependent on southern Africa for its uranium supply, and was willing to go to great lengths to secure the critical fuel for its nuclear arsenal. Borstelmann also notes that race relations in the segregated U.S. played a role in Washington's policies, with few white Americans greatly disturbed by the establishment of apartheid. As South Africa finally nears an end to almost fifty years of formal apartheid (and as Truman nears canonization, following the recent presidential election), Borstelmann's account comes as a startling reminder of America's early links to Pretoria's racist system

The Internationalists : How a Radical Plan to Outlaw War Remade the World

History

Author - Oona A. Hathaway, Scott J. Shapiro
Publisher - Simon and Schuster
Pages - 608
ISBN - 1501109863


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Detail - "The Internationalists tells the story of the Peace Pact by placing it in the long history of international law from the seventeenth century through the present, tracing this rich history through a fascinating and diverse array of lawyers, politicians and intellectuals--Hugo Grotius, Nishi Amane, Salmon Levinson, James Shotwell, Sumner Welles, Carl Schmitt, Hersch Lauterpacht, and Sayyid Qutb. It tells of a centuries-long struggle of ideas over the role of war in a just world order. It details the brutal world of conflict the Peace Pact helped extinguish, and the subsequent era where tariffs and sanctions take the place of tanks and gunships." --Amazon.

U.S. Foreign Policy Towards Apartheid South Africa, 1948–1994 : Conflict of Interests

Political Science

Author - A. Thomson
Publisher - Springer
Pages - 249
ISBN - 023061728X


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Detail - This book charts the evolution of US foreign policy towards South Africa, beginning in 1948 when the architects of apartheid, the Nationalist Party, came to power. Thomson highlights three sets of conflicting Western interests: strategic, economic and human rights.

Dimensions internationales des droits de l'homme :

Law

Author - Karel Vasak, Philip Alston
Publisher - Westport, Conn. : Greenwood Press ; Paris, France : Unesco
Pages - 755
ISBN - 9780313233968


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Detail - Annex II. Figures :.

Human Security and the UN : A Critical History

Political Science

Author - S. Neil MacFarlane, Yuen Foong Khong
Publisher - Indiana University Press
Pages - 368
ISBN - 9780253111999


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Detail - How did the individual human being become the focus of the contemporary discourse on security? What was the role of the United Nations in "securing" the individual? What are the payoffs and costs of this extension of the concept? Neil MacFarlane and Yuen Foong Khong tackle these questions by analyzing historical and contemporary debates about what is to be secured. From Westphalia through the 19th century, the state's claim to be the object of security was sustainable because it offered its subjects some measure of protection. The state's ability to provide security for its citizens came under heavy strain in the 20th century as a result of technological, strategic, and ideological innovations. By the end of World War II, efforts to reclaim the security rights of individuals gathered pace, as seen in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and a host of United Nations covenants and conventions. MacFarlane and Khong highlight the UN's work in promoting human security ideas since the 1940s, giving special emphasis to its role in extending the notion of security to include development, economic, environmental, and other issues in the 1990s.

Racing the Enemy : Stalin, Truman, and the Surrender of Japan

History

Author - Tsuyoshi Hasegawa
Publisher - Harvard University Press
Pages - 382
ISBN - 9780674038400


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Detail - With startling revelations, Tsuyoshi Hasegawa rewrites the standard history of the end of World War II in the Pacific. By fully integrating the three key actors in the story--the United States, the Soviet Union, and Japan--Hasegawa for the first time puts the last months of the war into international perspective. From April 1945, when Stalin broke the Soviet-Japanese Neutrality Pact and Harry Truman assumed the presidency, to the final Soviet military actions against Japan, Hasegawa brings to light the real reasons Japan surrendered. From Washington to Moscow to Tokyo and back again, he shows us a high-stakes diplomatic game as Truman and Stalin sought to outmaneuver each other in forcing Japan's surrender; as Stalin dangled mediation offers to Japan while secretly preparing to fight in the Pacific; as Tokyo peace advocates desperately tried to stave off a war party determined to mount a last-ditch defense; and as the Americans struggled to balance their competing interests of ending the war with Japan and preventing the Soviets from expanding into the Pacific. Authoritative and engrossing, Racing the Enemy puts the final days of World War II into a whole new light.

The Evolution and Legitimacy of International Security Institutions :

Political Science

Author - M. Patrick Cottrell
Publisher - Cambridge University Press
Pages - 280
ISBN - 1107121116


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Detail - This book tackles the question: when international security institutions face a legitimacy crisis, why are some replaced while others endure?

Bringing Human Rights Home : A History of Human Rights in the United States

History

Author - Cynthia Soohoo, Catherine Albisa, Martha F. Davis
Publisher - University of Pennsylvania Press
Pages - 411
ISBN - 081222079X


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Detail - Throughout its history, America's policies have alternatively embraced human rights, regarded them with ambivalence, or rejected them out of hand. The essays in this volume put these shifting political winds into a larger historical perspective, from the country's very beginnings to the present day.

Foundations of World Order : The Legalist Approach to International Relations (1898-1922)

Law

Author - Francis Anthony Boyle
Publisher - Duke University Press
Pages - 220
ISBN - 9780822323648


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Detail - One volume of multi-volume history of international law.