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Gone With The Wind On Film

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The Complete Gone with the Wind Trivia Book : The Movie and More

Performing Arts

Author - Pauline Bartel
Publisher - Taylor Trade Publishing
Pages - 126
ISBN - 1461604222


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Detail - A collection of everything trivia fans might want to know about a true : movie classic. Readers will learn what brand of typewriter Margaret Mitchell used to type the original book, the parallels between Scarlett's life and the author's, and the ins and outs of casting. Trivia quizzes and a bibliography are included.

Gone with the Wind as Book and Film :

Performing Arts

Author - Richard Barksdale Harwell
Publisher -
Pages - 274
ISBN - 9780872498365


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Detail - A collection of the most significant writings about the book, film & author by the foremost authority on Gone With the Wind, Richard Harwell.

Gone with the Wind on Film : A Complete Reference Work

Literary Criticism

Author - Cynthia Marylee Molt
Publisher - McFarland Publishing
Pages - 512
ISBN - 9780786472826


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Detail - This is the definitive collection of data about all aspects of this film. The ten sections focus on characters in the novel, the players and their own histories, costuming (every major garment worn), major set furnishings, the filming schedule, etc. Also: bibliographies, discographies, filmographies of the actors and actresses, and collectibles. An appendix lists available still photographs.

The Complete Gone with the Wind Trivia Book :

Performing Arts

Author - Pauline C. Bartel
Publisher - Rowman & Littlefield
Pages - 200
ISBN - 0878336192


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Detail - Gathers information about Margaret Mitchell, her novel and the making of the film, and includes trivia questions and answers

The Scarlett Letters : The Making of the Film Gone With the Wind

Biography & Autobiography

Author - John Wiley Jr.
Publisher - Rowman & Littlefield
Pages - 536
ISBN - 1589798732


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Detail - One month after her novel Gone With the Wind was published, Margaret Mitchell sold the movie rights for fifty thousand dollars. Fearful of what the studio might do to her story—“I wouldn’t put it beyond Hollywood to have . . . Scarlett seduce General Sherman,” she joked—the author washed her hands of involvement with the film. However, driven by a maternal interest in her literary firstborn and compelled by her Southern manners to answer every fan letter she received, Mitchell was unable to stay aloof for long. In this collection of her letters about the 1939 motion picture classic, readers have a front-row seat as the author watches the Dream Factory at work, learning the ins and outs of filmmaking and discovering the peculiarities of a movie-crazed public. Her ability to weave a story, so evident in Gone With the Wind, makes for delightful reading in her correspondence with a who’s who of Hollywood, from producer David O. Selznick, director George Cukor, and screenwriter Sidney Howard, to cast members Clark Gable, Vivien Leigh, Leslie Howard, Olivia de Havilland and Hattie McDaniel. Mitchell also wrote to thousands of others—aspiring actresses eager to play Scarlett O’Hara; fellow Southerners hopeful of seeing their homes or their grandmother’s dress used in the film; rabid movie fans determined that their favorite star be cast; and creators of songs, dolls and Scarlett panties who were convinced the author was their ticket to fame and fortune. During the film’s production, she corrected erring journalists and the producer’s over-the-top publicist who fed the gossip mills, accuracy be damned. Once the movie finished, she struggled to deal with friends and strangers alike who “fought and trampled little children and connived and broke the ties of lifelong friendship” to get tickets to the premiere. But through it all, she retained her sense of humor. Recounting an acquaintance’s denial of the rumor that the author herself was going to play Scarlett, Mitchell noted he “ungallantly stated that I was something like fifty years too old for the part.” After receiving numerous letters and phone calls from the studio about Belle Watling’s accent, the author related her father was “convulsed at the idea of someone telephoning from New York to discover how the madam of a Confederate bordello talked.” And in a chatty letter to Gable after the premiere, Mitchell coyly admitted being “feminine enough to be quite charmed” by his statement to the press that she was “fascinating,” but added: “Even my best friends look at me in a speculative way—probably wondering what they overlooked that your sharp eyes saw!” As Gone With the Wind marks its seventy-fifth anniversary on the silver screen, these letters, edited by Mitchell historian John Wiley, Jr., offer a fresh look at the most popular motion picture of all time through the eyes of the woman who gave birth to Scarlett.

The Making of Gone With The Wind :

Performing Arts

Author - Steve Wilson
Publisher - University of Texas Press
Pages - 352
ISBN - 0292761260


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Detail - Companion publication to the Harry Ransom Center's exhibition, September 9, 2014-January 4, 2015, marking the seventy-fifth anniversary of the film's release.

A celebration of Gone with the wind :

Performing Arts

Author - Adrian Turner
Publisher - Collins & Brown
Pages - 189
ISBN -


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Detail -

Film Adaptation and Its Discontents : From Gone with the Wind to The Passion of the Christ

Performing Arts

Author - Thomas Leitch
Publisher - JHU Press
Pages - 372
ISBN - 0801891876


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Detail - Most books on film adaptation—the relation between films and their literary sources—focus on a series of close one-to-one comparisons between specific films and canonical novels. This volume identifies and investigates a far wider array of problems posed by the process of adaptation. Beginning with an examination of why adaptation study has so often supported the institution of literature rather than fostering the practice of literacy, Thomas Leitch considers how the creators of short silent films attempted to give them the weight of literature, what sorts of fidelity are possible in an adaptation of sacred scripture, what it means for an adaptation to pose as an introduction to, rather than a transcription of, a literary classic, and why and how some films have sought impossibly close fidelity to their sources. After examining the surprisingly divergent fidelity claims made by three different kinds of canonical adaptations, Leitch's analysis moves beyond literary sources to consider why a small number of adapters have risen to the status of auteurs and how illustrated books, comic strips, video games, and true stories have been adapted to the screen. The range of films studied, from silent Shakespeare to Sherlock Holmes to The Lord of the Rings, is as broad as the problems that come under review. -- Shannon Wells-Lassagne

Scarlett's Women : 'Gone With the Wind' and its Female Fans

Literary Criticism

Author - Helen Taylor
Publisher - Hachette UK
Pages - 288
ISBN - 0349005125


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Detail - One of the most successful books ever published and the basis of one of the most popular and highly praised Hollywood films of all time, Gone With the Wind has entered world culture in a way that few other stories have. Seventy-five years on from the cinematic release of Gone with the Wind, Helen Taylor looks at the reasons why the book and film have had such an appeal, especially for women. Drawing on letters and questionnaires from female fans, she brings together material from southern history, literature, film and feminist theory and discusses the themes of the Civil War and issues of race. She has previously written Gender, Race and Region in the writings of Grace King, Ruth McEnery Stuart and Kate Chopin and The Daphne Du Maurier Companion.

"Gone with the Wind" – Scarlett O’Hara in the novel and the film : A Comparison

Literary Criticism

Author - Jennifer Koss
Publisher - GRIN Verlag
Pages - 16
ISBN - 3640602641


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Detail - Seminar paper from the year 2008 in the subject English Language and Literature Studies - Literature, grade: 2,0, Ruhr-University of Bochum, language: English, abstract: 1. Introduction to the topic The following paper tries to introduce one of the most remarkable American novels of the 20th century and its most outstanding character Scarlett O’Hara. Gone with the Wind was written by Margaret Mitchell and was published in 1936. It is a novel that combines the events of the 19th century American Civil War with the story of Scarlett O’Hara, her family, her friends and her foes. It was followed by a film that was released in 1939 and two authorized sequels which were published in 1991 and 2007. Gone with the Wind plays in the Old American South and also reflects a Southern point of view of the events of the Civil War. It begins when Scarlett is 16 years old and ends when she is 28. The paper will try to give an insight to the character of Scarlett and will try to analyze what Scarlett stands for or if she stands for anything more than herself in the novel and the film.

Gone with the Wind :

Fiction

Author - Margaret Mitchell, Pat Conroy
Publisher - Simon and Schuster
Pages - 1472
ISBN - 1416548947


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Detail - The turbulent romance of Scarlett O'Hara and Rhett Butler is shaped by the ravages of the Civil War and Reconstruction.

Frankly, My Dear : Gone with the Wind Revisited

History

Author - Molly Haskell
Publisher - Yale University Press
Pages - 244
ISBN - 0300164378


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Detail - Haskell keeps both novel and movie at hand, moving from one to the other, comparing and distinguishing what Margaret Mitchell expresses from what obsessive producer David O. Selznick, directors George Cukor and Victor Fleming, screenplaywrights Sidney Howard and a host of fixers (including Ben Hecht and Scott Fitzgerald), and actors Vivien Leigh, Clark Gable, Hattie McDaniel, and others convey. She emphasizes the contributions of Selznick, Leigh, and in an entire chapter, Mitchell, drawing heavily and analytically on existing biographies, the literature of women and the Civil War, Civil War films (especially Birth of a Nation and Jezebel), and film criticism to such engaging effect as to not just revisit GWTW but to revive and intensify the enduring fascination of what Selznick dubbed the American Bible. --Olson, Ray Copyright 2009 Booklist.